Minecraft Mania

big tree house

the challenge was “20 minutes to build a tree house,” grades 3-5.

Specs: Max registration of 20 participants (with a waitlist of 5). Two sessions for grades 3-5 and one for grades 6-8. We do this combination of three classes as often as possible based on the library’s schedule and the availability of the room/computers, which is usually 2 times per quarter.

Techs: We use Minecraft EDU software and the Lab computers (a set of laptops purchased by the library for program use). Each participant gets their own laptop and joins a shared Minecraft world (server) that is exclusive to the program.

Recs: You cannot run a Minecraft program ‘cold.’ The kids who sign up will eat you alive. You must spend significant time playing on your own first; an absolute minimum of 5 hours will give you enough familiarity with controls, materials, and situations to get by, but keep in mind that many of the kids who sign up will have been spending all of their allotted daily screen time on this for months, even years, and they will know more than you. The more you play, the better this program will go. If you don’t have five hours of off-desk time to spend in-game, give up this dream, or give it to someone who does.

As much as they may beg you, do not let them run wild for the whole session in PVP. It’s a waste of your valuable time and expensive resources. Create a curriculum for your Minecraft program that is worth the energy and expense required to present it to the public. Pick a STEAM objective to focus on and let your curriculum flow from that starting point:

  • Science: Set up a world where the children will act as scientific explorers of an uncharted world. Like real scientists, they need to Survive the elements, Discover new things about the environment, and Record their findings.
  • Technology: ComputerCraftEDU
  • Engineering: Build roller coasters, obstacle courses, or complex labyrinths using redstone.
  • Art: Challenge them to create pixel art or work together on a group build.
  • Math: Use a timer and do speed challenges – 5 minutes to build a symmetrical 4-sided pyramid; 10 minutes to build a circle; 15 minutes to build a sundial. Or, challenge them to make an in-game graph to represent data that you provide (or better yet, data they gather themselves). Don’t forget that Minecraft uses an X/Y/Z grid to create coordinates for every block: an easy, built-right-in math concept that you can use.

If you are struggling to generate ideas on your own, my favorite curriculum planning resource is the MinecraftEDU World Library. Even if you don’t have the EDU version of the game, you can still browse these user-created worlds for ideas that you can use in your own programs.

I hosted a similar program on a much smaller budget at my previous library. You can read about it here.

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2 thoughts on “Minecraft Mania

  1. tracey says:

    Thank you so much for the great tips! I’ve been wondering about all of these things (registration group size, format of program, STEM lessons, etc.) so it’s a very useful and timely post.

    Like

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