Write Away

Easy, Free, and Rewarding: I love this program so much. Here’s a newsletter description:

“Stretch the imagination in this creative writing workshop! Launch your writing with themed story starters and fun activities.”

And a typical event outline, which I modify to be age appropriate for two different sessions:

Grades 3-4  //  Grades 5-8

  • Warm Up Activity
    • Choose something quick and fun that doesn’t require a ton of critical thinking.
    • This is a good spot for activities that introduce new vocabulary words.
  • Writing Challenge
    • Don’t make these static: never say something as basic as “write a story about BLANK.” The kids will be more engaged and successful if you lead an activity that guides them toward creativity, rather than an assignment that demands creativity upfront.
    • With grades 3-4, I usually do something that involves a picture book; I read, and they munch on snacks and listen, and they extend the story somehow.
    • With grades 5-8, I use an activity that draws on something they already know about, like dystopias or emojis or fanfiction.
  • Snack Break
    • Brain Food: cookies, pretzels, water. You know the drill.
  • Writing Challenge 2
    • Same guidelines as above, but this is a distinct second activity. Here are some that I’ve done:
      • Hang up emoji in a random order: they write one sentence of a story per emoji.
      • Read a picture book out loud, but don’t show them the cover or the pictures. They draw the cover.
      • Read a picture book out loud, but stop 75% of the way through. They write the ending.
      • Write the story of the day you were born: for an extra challenge, don’t use these words – baby, hospital, mother, father.
  • Sharing
    • Don’t force it, but always offer. Some kids like to share.

I don’t have a particular resource to recommend for designing the writing challenges and warm ups: the ones I’ve used have been my own invention, influenced strongly by my own experience as a writer, journaler, and reader. “Writing prompts” is a rich and varied google search, and as good a place as any to start out.

When you lead this program, and you’re giving the students time to write, it’s very important that you write along with them. Sit there, at the front of the room, visible to all, and do the challenge along with them. Offer to share what you wrote. Be prepared to jump up and help them when they get stuck. And be flexible – this isn’t school! If they’re stressed out, change the script so they’re having fun instead. The learning will follow!

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